Three tips to boost your internal network

shutterstock_223821064

Traditionally, a lot of attention has been given to encouraging professionals at all levels to “get out there” and make contacts in the market place – and why not? – but with a lesser focus on the internal side of such activity. No doubt, many assume that this will happen anyway: but often it doesn’t….or at least not enough of the right stuff.

It has always been important to connect with colleagues in other departments or practices to generate more opportunities to do business with clients. This is even more the case now with renewed activity for mergers, acquisitions, team hires and the like, and firms getting bigger and more complex all the time. But whatever the situation, the whole firm has to add up to more than the sum of its parts to be successful. Here are three things that can help.

WHO do I need to know (more)?  Good internal networking is a planned approach. For some, the temptation can be to just launch themselves everywhere with everyone….quickly to run out of steam when nothing is immediately achieved. Decide where co-operation for your expertise and skill areas will bear most fruit and prioritise the individuals and teams that matter most. This is usually a long game, so stay positive and persevere if nothing instant occurs: and don’t be distracted by those who are most welcoming if they do not fit this bill, unless they are connected to those that do.

Let’s get visible!  From who, now focus on planning and doing the WHAT. You are undertaking an internal marketing campaign that should include as many relevant opportunities as possible to achieve exposure and face time – so stuff like:

  • Presentations: look for relevant slots (e.g. departmental or team meetings) to deliver short, punchy content – what I/we do, how we do it, who we do it with, what we can do together and offer you – or address relevant, topical issues for your audience and their clients.
  • Social gatherings: these could be informal or formal events, lunches (coffee/tea for those who are busy), one-to-ones etc.
  • Client marketing: take those topical issues above and volunteer content for the firm’s blog, newsletters, events, and other external promotional activity, making sure that your efforts are broadcast internally as well.

Give (as well as take)  Digging out new chances to serve clients of the firm through colleagues must not be a one-way street if you want to succeed. The two related essences of any good networking are reciprocity and trust: demonstrate that you are happy to share your knowledge and contacts so that others trust you with theirs. You will soon find out who shares this philosophy and are deserving of your efforts…..and who doesn’t.

James Newberry runs People Scope, a consultancy, interim, training and coaching firm working with lawyers, accountants and other specialists to help them operate successfully outside of their comfort zones. http://www.peoplescope.com.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s