Three ways to start making simple sense

 

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We all want to make a good impression – so why can we end up achieving the exact opposite?

For example, I get to watch a lot of business presentations by professional people.  Good, knowledgeable folk who clearly want to show they can be of use to their clients, customers, or colleagues.  But they don’t.  Why?  because they forget the very simple things that help us start making sense to others.  Here are three ways that the good ‘uns do it.

Stop doing “big content”  ‘Big data’ might be a topically-thrilling concept in some IT-related circles..but not here. I have watched many lawyers who love to use big content – for example, the finer points of legal employment cases. Many tens of Powerpoint slides giving the blow-by-blow of it all.  “Look how much I know!” they seem to be saying. Meanwhile the audience slowly sags visibly under the weight of it all – usually before five minutes are up.

Think about them not you  Building on this first point, people are simple organisms when it comes to making sense to them.  Often, they just want to hear three basic things:

  • What is the point or essence that I need to know?
  • Why is this important to me?
  • As a result, what should I do and how?

The rest is dangerously large amounts of fluff that will clog up everyone’s neural pathways if we don’t keep their needs in mind.

Tell your stories  Quite a lot of professionals also struggle with a question they feel they must answer: “How do I sell me and/or the firm?”.  This can make them feel very uncomfortable – after all they are rarely specialist sales people who, it is assumed, should know this sort of thing.

But the solution is again simple and does not require specialist knowledge: “Don’t”.  Just show them how you have helped others to achieve or solve things – tell your stories.  They will do a far better job of marketing you than a million glossy brochures and websites or bucket loads of self-promoting blather.

James Newberry runs People Scope, a consultancy, interim, training and coaching firm working with lawyers, accountants and other specialists to help them operate successfully outside of their comfort zones. http://www.peoplescope.com.