Three tips for good performance feedback

dreamstime_m_37755817Many are considering abolition of the dreaded annual appraisal – what could possibly go wrong?

Microsoft, Adobe, Accenture and now a host of professional firms have decided to embrace the brave new world of continuous feedback – and not before time.  Too much has been vested in slow, cumbersome, infrequent, and often poorly implemented annual appraisal systems that leave a significant population of participants feeling less than motivated.

However, it is often easier to state an intention than it is to implement such a new ‘way of working’ successfully. Why? Because providing more communication requires more of everybody if it is to be effective – a fact that we need to recognise and act upon.

Here are three observations that can help guide all performance conversations – whether you are giving or receiving them.

Do the 3is.  These are some of the new ‘asks’ if you are engaged in continuous feedback.

  • Interest – for some, annual appraisal meant being able to ignore people (as opposed to task) dialogue until absolutely necessary, usually when the paperwork arrived.  The new expectation involves demonstrating ongoing interest in your staff, what/how they do, and acting upon it in real time – e.g. providing immediate recognition for a job well done, without waiting for a “scheduled” discussion.
  • Invest – so explicitly, leaders need to invest more time and effort in the conduct of performance management – talking regularly with staff and providing coaching-style inputs for which some may need skills development help. Hoisting the “I’m too busy” flag will not wash.  Nor will exhibiting “Why are we doing this? – I didn’t need to be told” attitudes.
  • Inspire – team members will expect their leaders to prepare and provide positive developmental inputs that motivate them.  “Employees appreciate the conversation when it’s done right…where it is rushed and formulaic and is in quick messages that haven’t been thought-through, that doesn’t work.  But where there’s preparation, thought and intent behind it, it’s really positive”**.

Share ownership.. for the process and its outcomes with team members, making the new nature of what happens clear to them – and that they need to be thinking about and contributing actively to the dialogue and actions that you agree together going forward.

Don’t ignore metrics.  Measurables are still important to any organisation, appraisal or no appraisal.  But these are only part of the equation which should focus on the specifics of how the individual can develop and improve their performance.

** 2015 Performance Management Research, PwC

James Newberry runs People Scope, a consultancy, interim, training and coaching firm working with lawyers, accountants and other specialists to help them operate successfully outside of their comfort zones. http://www.peoplescope.com.